Wednesday, 23 July 2014

A Farewell to Dora Bryan

 
 
 
Something about Dora Bryan's appearance in a film was a guarantee of a particular kind of authenticity. Her performances in films like The Blue Lamp and A Taste of Honey  added colour and character in the days of black and white.
 
In THE WOMEN THEY LEFT BEHIND (2009) we told the story of Rita, the wife of a Grimsby fisherman. An offer of a trip to London in the Grimsby Evening Telegraph in 1969 had given George and Rita their first chance of a weekend away.  
 
'The lady over the road said she’d look after my kids and we went to London. It was the first time George and I had been away together without the kids and it was the first time I’d been to London. We went down on the train and stayed at the Green Park Hotel. I remember going to Petticoat Lane and walking around Piccadilly Circus on the Friday evening; I wanted to see the lights and the ladies of the night. On the Saturday we went to a show with Dora Bryan at the Prince of Wales Theatre. We went into this pub for a drink and a sandwich afterwards and she was behind us talking and she saw us. Well, we’d been sat near the front and I’d laughed so much that when George said something I nearly wet myself. She heard my laugh and came over and said, “You were on the second row, I’d recognise that laugh anywhere.” She shoved my husband along the bench and sat talking to us. She was lovely, ordinary, like us.'
 
 

2 comments:

  1. What a nice story, sounds like she was a lovely lady. I remember her making a record many, many years ago called "All I want for Christmas is a Beatle" which my parents bought for me as a Chrimbo extra. Ah, childhood...

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  2. Given it was 40 years later, it clearly still meant a lot to Rita. I remember the record, only slightly retrospectively, back in the days there were a stack of novelty tunes in the family record box (see also Tommy Cooper's 'Don't Jump Off the Roof Dad')

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