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Frank's Wild Years On the Road



With the end of the Frank's Wild Years book signing tour in sight, here's a rundown of the events lined up for June. In which Frank finally goes south and there's a return (twice) to the city of steel.

Wednesday 6th June [re-scheduled for Friday 8th June] Radio Humberside interview with Mr James Hoggarth. It's an afternoon slot, around 3pm talking about all things crime-writing, Humber Mouth and beyond. Available on BBC iplayer for a week afterwards.

Saturday 9th June - Book signing at Sheffield Waterstones, Orchard Square 11am. Yes, like all good novels it ends where it began - almost, but with the protagonist slightly battered, having learned something about himself and trying to make sense of what just happened. Feel free to turn up and say hello.

'From what twisted imagination
was this demon Elvis born?' - The Times


Thursday 21st June - evening session with the now legendary Sheffield WEA writing group, run (I use the term advisedly) by the Crumpmeister, Mr Simon Crump. Looking forward to reading from Frank's Wild Years and talking about some of the research that went into the book and all things creative writing.


Tonbridge Castle - nice place for a gig, innit?

Saturday 23rd June - Tonbridge Arts Festival. Down in the deep south, well Kent, in a marquee in the grounds of Tonbridge Castle from 12.30-6pm, meeting with Caffeine Nights labelmates Ian Ayris, Alison Taft and Carol and Bob Bridgestock.  As well as reading from Frank's Wild Years, talking about the writing and publishing process and fielding questions as part of a panel along with authors B.R. Collins, Jessica Thompson and Eleanor Prescott. Click the link for details.


Poster design: Paul Davy

And finally, for now at least, The Hardest of Times an evening of readings and chat about the city of Hull, the Humber and its influence on crime-writing. We'll be looking at the roots of the genre, making the link with Charles Dickens on his bicentenary and delving into the past of one of the city's all too briefly adopted sons, Ted Lewis.

Taking place at Hull Central Library and organised as part of the Humber Mouth Festival, the evening features authors David Mark and Nick Quantrill with proceedings MC'd by Hull playwright and director, Dave Windass. Click the poster for booking details for this and plenty more Humber Mouth events.

See you along the way, someplace. NT






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