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Reading Event/New Fiction - 'Freeman Street'


Freeman Street Market - circa 1955



“… like me dad used to say, when the absent friends outscore those who’ve turned up, it’s time to call it a day.”

Freeman Street is a new short story (at least I think it's a short story) commissioned for this year's Great Grimsby Literature Festival.

Although its foundation is partly in research carried out for the social history book The Women They Left Behind in 2008/9, Freeman Street tells the entirely fictional story of Julie, once the wife of a fisherman, who finds herself on a pilgrimage to Grimsby after thirty years away. As the trip unfolds and once familiar streets roll by, Julie is increasingly haunted by an episode from her past.

I’ll be reading Freeman Street for the first time at Grimsby Minster on Friday 25 October as part of Local Life, a lunchtime (12.00-1.00pm) reading session for adults, alongside other new pieces of work commissioned for the festival.

 

Comments

  1. I'd love to see your Freeman Street Nick. Imagine a saltier, lower slung Beasley Street. One things f'sure, you're a different person by the time you reach the end of it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. That's the plan, Loz. The short story was well-received, which had me wondering about how far to take it. Clearly lots of mileage in Freemo '73.

    Incidentally, the latest: Council digging up pavements, causing massive disruption, replacing with ... black and white paving stones. The street will look something like a very long chess board - with boarded and shuttered shops. NELC surpasses itself. Again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Clearly haven't learned anything from Victoria Street! Although there's something Bergman esque about lifesize chess with broken pieces

      Delete

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